The Woman Who Stayed In Style

Found photos

One common assumption about older women is that they are much less likely to keep up with current clothing trends.  I notice this in my own dress.  There are lots of explanations for this phenomenon.  Usually older women have discovered styles that they feel comfortable in and are much less likely to want to change them.  They have reached a point in their lives where impressing others with stylish clothes is not as important—if it ever was.  And since poverty often rises among women as they age, perhaps they just don’t have the money to stay in style.

But of course every generalization is just that—a blanket statement that cannot cover everyone’s experience.  Above we have a case in point, a woman I’m guessing to be in her late forties to early fifties who is experimenting with 1940s styles.  The photo on the left is even dated—1941.  The others came from the same batch of photos purchased from a favorite eBay dealer.  She has clearly taken up the trend for bifurcated garments—I’m betting that what looks to be a short skirt on the right are in fact a pair of culottes.

This woman, whoever she is, has a body shape praised in contemporary films and fashion magazines, with ample breasts, a small waist, and long legs.  She has decided to show off these assets through her clothes.  Note how her head is tilted in the same direction in all the photos.

And how about you?  Do you keep up with current styles?

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4 Responses to The Woman Who Stayed In Style

  1. JS says:

    “There are lots of explanations for this phenomenon. Usually older women have discovered styles that they feel comfortable in and are much less likely to want to change them. They have reached a point in their lives where impressing others with stylish clothes is not as important—if it ever was. And since poverty often rises among women as they age, perhaps they just don’t have the money to stay in style.”

    I think those all have merit. I don’t keep up. Money is partly an issue, although even when young I usually had a pretty individualistic take on fashion and comfort was always paramount: I never wore extremely high heels (some people commented). Some years, I’d have fit right in with the current prairie dress trend. I still like it, but am a little wary of looking silly now that my 20s are long past.

    I have, however, studied sewing and tailoring pretty extensively, so I could make my own clothes and that was the plan. But apart from my insecurities about fitting myself (I have a padded dress form that’s never been used), I have to lose weight. Of course, I tell myself, “Just make something! You can take it in later or make something else.” But the need to lose weight is my current excuse.

  2. eimear says:

    I would happily wear some of my same clothes forever if it wasnt for an expanding waistline! having said that, I also like to look at fashion magazines to see trends which will inspire new makes. Its nice to change things up a bit, but I will probably dress far more for practicality and comfort than I did in my early 20s.
    If I had this ladys long legs…… I would definitely be making jumpsuits (which I have avoided making for myself!)

  3. Lizzie says:

    No, I really don’t keep up with current fashion. At 65 I think I dress “young” for my age, but in my case that just means no long skirts!

  4. Laura says:

    I make a point at getting a new top or scarf or something every season. I tend to wear either Jean’s and tshirts, or older lady wears linen everything, that I usually say myself.

    I am also fascinated by shoes. Comfort and cuteness of shoes just keeps getting better! Wearing something that the ” kids” are wearing, in a knock of version of course, is an easy, and comfortable way, to stay fresh!

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